Jane Eyre my first favorite heroine

This design is available on shirts, mugs, and many other items in my cafepress shop at this link

http://www.cafepress.com/aliceflynn/7654444

When I was in elementary school, I read Jane Eyre over, and over, and over again.  She was the first heroine who really charmed me.

Mr. Rochester didn’t steal my heart the way Darcy did.  I was always sympathetic to his poor insane wife, a woman who lived in a prison of the way society rejected mental illness and medical care did not understand or have any solutions for her condition.

Charlotte Bronte’s sister, Emily, received more movie attention with her dashing Heathcliff (Laurence Olivier) and Cathy in Wuthering Heights.   That black and white film version became a classic, but any film attempt I’ve seen so far of Jane Eyre could never capture what the book meant to me.

I’m hoping a new generation will read Jane Eyre and find the girl and woman who was created by Charlotte Bronte.

If this image looks familiar, it is like one I used for Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennett.

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About aliceflynn

Artist - find me on wordpress and at aliceflynn.com.
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One Response to Jane Eyre my first favorite heroine

  1. I had seen two versions of the story in film, and liked both. There is something compelling about the story.
    I will not review the story itself, it has stood the test of time. Suffice to say I recommend it.

    This was my first read of the book, and my first experience reading an e-book. I downloaded the Kindle version to my Android phone.
    This is an excellent adaptation. It reads well on my phone, and would be, I’m sure, even better on the Kindle device (larger pages means less turning). The illustrations are a nice touch, and the link to the audio version is appreciated. I will probably download it and record for use in my car during commutes.
    Lastly, for the price of 0.89 how can you go wrong.

    If you are like me and trying to catch up on the classics you never got to read, you could do worse than start here.

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